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Flint Local NewsState of Michigan and City of Flint partnership accelerates repair efforts for...

State of Michigan and City of Flint partnership accelerates repair efforts for local residents affected by water infrastructure projects

Flint, Michigan – Beginning this past Monday, workers started repairing road surfaces, sidewalks, and residential lawns damaged by lead service line replacement. Aimed at accelerating the restoration process for nearly 1,800 houses impacted by past water infrastructure projects, this program highlights a noteworthy collaboration between the City of Flint and the State of Michigan.

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Under the partnership, Flint’s current engineering and construction contracts will be sent to the state, therefore enabling further state money to be added into the project. This planned action guarantees that the repair effort may start without delays, which is essential to help to heal the marks left by the Flint water disaster.

The State of Michigan has allocated a significant $97 million for these initiatives—more especially, for Flint’s lead service line excavation, replacement, and restoration operations. The City of Flint has used almost all of this sum thus far; only roughly $1.1 to $1.2 million remains. But under the NRDC/Concerned Pastors settlement agreement, the projected cost to finish the required restoration comes out to be almost $4,654,500.

Beginning this past Monday, workers started repairing road surfaces, sidewalks, and residential lawns damaged by lead service line replacement
Credit: Unsplash

Read also: MDOT begins $2.3 million resurfacing project on M-57 in Genesee County on July 15, finish expected by September

Flint Mayor Sheldon Neeley expressed his gratitude towards the State of Michigan for its ongoing support.

“I want to thank the State of Michigan for its steadfast partnership as we continue to work together to heal the wounds of the Flint water crisis,” Flint Mayor Sheldon Neeley said in a statement. “Every lawn left unrestored is an unhealed contusion from the catastrophe that our community has survived. We will never forget, but we will heal, continue to provide resources to the most vulnerable among us, and move forward as a strong community.”

Phil Roos, the director of the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE), highlighted the importance of this agreement in rebuilding trust and infrastructure.

“This agreement is another stride forward in an ongoing partnership with the City of Flint and residents that has helped rebuild Flint’s drinking water infrastructure, restore neighborhoods where the work was completed, and renew trust,” said Phil Roos, director of the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE). “Every resident deserves confidence in their drinking water and to live in a safe, thriving community. We are pleased to bring resources to bear to support Flint in this work.”

Flint residents are reminded to pick up free faucet water filters kept at Flint City Hall and the City of Flint Service Center on Clio Rd. as part of their community outreach initiatives. Free water testing kits are also available to let residents keep an eye on their water quality.

Read also: Michigan approves budget with tuition-free community college, greater preschool access

The City of Flint has so far finished an amazing record of 29,777 water service line excavations and identifications, including replacement of 10, 529 lead service lines. The rest, made of copper, did not require replacement. Flint’s water has consistently tested below the lead action levels for more than seven years, showing notable improvement toward providing its residents with safe drinking water.